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Feel at one with the Sanctuary as you explore the territory in an intimate fashion, from an elevated position in our custom built, open- sided game vehicle. Our experienced rangers will show you some of the stunning views of the area, together with birds, trees, carpets of wildflowers and the animals who tread over them. Using this intimate interface, feel at one with the amazing safari experience that is Lions Bluff .

As part of our extensive eco-interface we offer cultural visits to local villages and schools. For the Taita Village Visit, you are invited to enter a typical ethnic home and participate in cooking a traditional meal and enjoying it, with the families. Or help in the local beer making process and if you like tasting too. Visitors are welcomed to watch and participate in the traditional dance “mwazindika”.

Awake with the African Sunrise and take a drive in our open-sided game vehicle to an area where it is safe to walk in the wilderness. Accompanied by Lumo Community Wildlife Sanctuary’s skilled rangers, walk amongst the tracks and signs, flora and fauna of this protected area.
This is a gentle ramble, suitable for all ages for those with an enquiring mind about the world around them. Allow our ranger to enjoy showing you the environment in which they grew up, their intimate knowledge of the insects, birds, tracks and signs.

Ideally a bush walk culminates in the best meal of the day being enhanced by being eaten under a tree, enjoying one of our many stunning views within the Sanctuary.
Fresh fruit, juice, tea and coffee and a cooked breakfast to your requirements will be freshly produced under a nearby tree, while you relax and soak up the atmosphere of the bush through which you have just meandered.

A great deal of the World War 1 war fought, won and lost by the European super powers and their allies in our backyard. Lions Bluff is situated close to the strategic arena in the East African campaign of World War 1. We host a series of unique battlefield tours which retrace the battle lines of perhaps the most strange campaign in British and German military history.